Search:



The Web

Rediff





    Home | News | Gallery
< Back > < Next >  

Without Anti Retroviral Therapy, HIV-infected children normally do not live beyond the age of 15. "But with the government now providing ART for free, we will soon see children living longer," says Dr Manorama.

"What will be their future?" she wonders.

"They are not going to get any physical support or social security. They will also be denied education. How are we going to prepare these children to face adolescence? They may fall in love, they may like to get married, there are a whole lot of issues. What is the solution? We should start thinking about all this," she says.

Krishnaveni, one of the first two inmates at CHES, wanted to live in a home where she had parents, brothers and sisters. 'I wish I had my parents. I wish I had a home. I wish I had a pond in my house. I wish I had lots of fish and lilies in the pond. I wish I had lots of books to read,' she had said.

However, she passed away in December 2002 without having her dreams fulfilled.

There are many Krishnavenis among the HIV infected children, who yearn for a family.

For some, this wish may come true. Overcoming prejudice, some families have come forward to adopt HIV-infected children.

< Back > < Next >  

Article Tools Email this article
Write us a letter

Copyright © 2004 rediff.com India Limited. All Rights Reserved.